Liz was born in Arizona, is the youngest of five children, and graduate of Salpointe High School. She always craved the spotlight, but growing up wasn’t sure exactly what that would mean for her. She started tap dancing at age 6, jazz dancing at 8, and thrived on performing. Between her parents and her older siblings, she was introduced to music from Frank Sinatra to Barbra Streisand, to Billy Joel and Barry Manilow. And then she saw a little movie called “Guys and Dolls” and discovered the genre of Musical Theatre. She recorded the audio onto a cassette tape and listened to it over and over. She longed to play Miss Adelaide someday. But she had never sang and no one in her family was musical.

In high school Liz decided to take drama class, and appeared in many of the productions there. Her Junior year the production was a Revue of different musicals, and the director told her although she had never sung in a show, that she should try it. When her parents came to see the show, they thought she might have some vocal talent and hired a University of Arizona vocal student to come to the house and give her weekly lessons. As she studied and practiced, she was able to improve and just begin to realize what her instrument could do. And then in her Senior year, she got to play the role she’d been dreaming of since she was a little girl: Miss Adelaide in Guys and Dolls. It was a joy and she definitely had caught the Musical Theatre bug.

When it was time to graduate and decide a college path for Liz, she didn’t really have anything in particular she loved that seemed like a solid career path. So she thought she’d get a degree in business or something relative to that, and explore a bit more. But when she went to her Freshman Orientation at the University of Arizona, something curious happened. They asked all the students to fill out a questionnaire regarding their interests, talents, activities they’d done in high school. After Liz completed the questionnaire, she was told that her perfect major was Musical Theatre. She was given a class schedule and was to report to her first class in a few weeks. She figured they must have known what they were doing, so she went ahead.

The first class she was to report to was Musical Theatre I. She entered the class, and the students, of which there were 8-10, were all chatting. Her nerves began to fray as she heard them all sharing stories about the number of shows they’d done, how they’d been singing since they were 8, 6, 4????? She definitely felt out of place and out of her league.When the professor entered the classroom and began to take roll, he said to her, “How did you get in this class?” Liz was confused. She explained they had registered her at orientation. The teacher then explained that admission into the Musical Theatre was program was by audition only. Surprisingly he said, “Come to the next class with an audition piece and I will tell you if you can stay”.

She had never prepared for a musical audition before, so she went home and tried to find a song from a musical that she could learn by ear in one day. She chose a song called “Small World” from the Musical “Gypsy”. She heard it on a Michael Feinstein CD she had and thought it would work in her voice. (Unbeknownst to her, it was a no-no for a woman to sing a man’s song at any kind of audition). Nevertheless, she came to the next class, knees shaking, and sang it acapella with the entire class watching. And then the professor said “Ok, you can stay”. And that was it! Fast forward a few years, and Liz had her degree in Musical Theatre.

Since then, Liz has consistently performed in Tucson and throughout the country in Musical Theatre, Cabaret, Jazz, and even Rock genres. She has also been a successful Financial Advisor since 2003, helping individuals and families plan for their financial goals. She is married to Alex, an CPA and fine actor in his own right. They have two children, Bella and A.J. Liz continues to develop new roles, shows, and collaborations year after year. Visit her upcoming events page for news on her latest performance dates.

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